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Tailwheels

Click any picture below to see a high resolution version.

The completed tailwheel.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 
Ready to bolt on, tires and tubes included in weight- Verified on US Postal scale.

8" ---- 7 lbs. 15 oz.
10" ---- 8 lbs. 12 oz.
tundra ---- 10 lbs. 8 oz.

 

 

 
I have had great enjoyment working out a process to produce these yokes and king pin assemblies in a consistent and true form. After much trial and error, we have built a streamlined setup that has been static tested to beyond the strength of the spring with no cracks, bending or breakage.

We are still working out a standard color, with a few that worked out to be chromated, some conventional paint, and some a powder coated bronze that looks to be a bit brown but has an excellent tough finish. We will be working with opinions of the builders for the final color, but an excellent hammered gun metal grey has shown itself to be a leading contender. After all, the tail wheels are always dirty from grease and ramp dirt, but we like them to look great when cleaned up too.

 

 

Locking pins and bushings. This is another time consuming job if you're making just one or two parts. These parts are always chromated, baked and kept on hand.

 

 

 

 

 

 

These are top caps for king pins, Chromated, baked and kept on hand. These caps should never bind with the steer arm/locking pin assembly. They are held in place with a loc-tite blue and a 5/16's fine AN bolt.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bronze king pin bushings. A very thin, but very important piece to keep proper tension to the tail wheel king pin. Again, hard to make if you're setting up for just one bushing. With our CNC controlled production, even 5-10 years from now these parts will go right in if ever needed. Nothing that would have to ever be fixed in the back country, but nice to know that US Postal Service can deliver in a letter the few parts you might ever have to replace.

 

 

 

This is what the cam body looks like before welding. We do a few things differently today, after working through some fixture process steps. This gives a good idea on the quality control of the parts we have. The cam top is made right into the part. NO welding of it for a true-to-base alignment. Again, 4130 N used throughout these parts.


 

 

 

 

 

 

Main cam bodies with bearings and bushing in place. These have all been chromated/baked and ready for assembly.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Welding the hardest part, the deep pockets in the cam body base. Requires good fixtures, steady hands, and patience to let the fill rod build, meld and keep from burning through.

 

 

 

 

 

Here is a close up the welds on the yoke, side plates of yoke, and deep pockets of the main cam body.
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

All the main parts together; please note the wear parts: locking pin, bushing, bearing and perhaps the locking pin spring. Replacement package for all would cost less than $29. I have had many request for various parts on a separate basis, though this sounds simple, it really is not. These parts are made to always fit my tail wheel and to my tolerance standards. So if one was to make a cam body and was off just .01 of an inch from the distance required for my king pin, it would throw everything else off. This would even include the locking pin, if the locking pin body had a different dimension of slot cut into it. My yokes are made to handle the wheel assembly as described in Bob Barrows' plans.

 

 

Ready for assembly. It's always great when things come together nicely.